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Chandler, W. H. (William Henry), 1841-1906

 Person

Found in 5 Collections and/or Records:

FR105 - Results of Chemical Analysis of Mrs. Amanda Lucas Who Died at Bethlehem, Pa. June 6, 1872, 1872

 Item — Frame: FR, Frame: 105
Scope and Contents See the attached note by Prof. Ned Heindel "William Chandler's Tutorial for Coroner's Jury"

Donated by Ned Heindel. Picked up from his office Mudd Building, June 28, 2018

Lecture notes taken by John Wesley Grace in William H. Chandler chemistry class

 Collection
Identifier: SC MS 0129
Overview A notebook that contains notes that were taken by John Wesley Grace (Lehigh University Class of 1899) during the Professor William Henry Chandler’s Chemistry lectures, in 1895.

Linderman Family Genealogy Documents (Including Brodhead, Packer, Sayre, Frick Families)

 Collection
Identifier: SC MS 0271
Overview An attempt is made to trace the Linderman Family as it is directly associated with Lehigh University. The Lindermans in the United States seemingly trace their ancestry to Jacob von Linderman who came to New York in 1710. He is believed to be a relative of the brother of Margarette Linderman Luther, the mother of the German Reformation religious leader, Martin Luther.

Speeches of Henry Sturgis Drinker President of Lehigh University

 Collection
Identifier: SC MS 0020
Overview Typescripts of speeches, many with additional penciled-in notes, given by Dr. Drinker as president of Lehigh University, as president of the American Forestry Association, and as a supporter of war preparedness and the Student Army Training Corps movement.

William Henry Chandler's Spittoon

 Item — Box: 0054.47, Item: 02
Identifier: 0054.47.02
Scope and Contents 0054.047.02 Spittoon Chandler's Students Made Him a Ceramic Spittoon William Chandler was a cigar smoker but he understood enough about safety that he didn't smoke in the lab when teaching experimental chemistry to his students. Instead he chewed tobacco and spat into the laboratory sinks. As a subtle hint that his students (in the academic year 1875) didn't approve of his use of "chew" or of his spitting in the sink, they fabricated this pottery spittoo , engraved a death head upon its...